Born in Atlanta, Phil Kimble went to school in Utah, lived for 2 years in LA, then moved back to Atlanta.  He and his wife Julie live in Conyers.  Mr. Kimble is an avid motorcyclist and competitive distance runner. He’s here today to chat about his new book, How to Make Good Decisions. 

Welcome to Blogger News, Phil. Tell us a bit about your book and what inspired you to write it.

I was watching my daughter struggle with a life decision about a college major, and I wondered why it was such a difficult challenge for her, why she couldn’t use decision models I have used in my professional career.  On the other hand, I saw in my professional career many instances where the only thing that was considered was the metrics of the choices, and wondered why the people involved couldn’t be more intuitive.  On both sides of the coin, it appeared that way too much time and emotion was invested in the struggle of a decision because of their narrow approaches.  If there was a way both the subjective and the objective could be wrapped together in the decision process, such an approach would be beneficial to both the individual and the organization.  The quantitative principles in the book are simplified and easy for the subjective person to apply, and the subjective principles are flags for even the most rigid organization.  Hopefully both will benefit.

How would you describe your creative process while writing this book? Was it stream-of-consciousness writing, or did you first write an outline?

It’s much like a construction project.  I start out with an idea, develop a concept, then blueprints (chapters and outlines), then fill in the details (research and writing).  It takes me about 3 or 4 re-writes before I start to polish the end product.

Who is your target audience?

Individuals who either have complex decisions to make, or who have trouble making any decision at all.

From the moment you conceived the idea for the story, to the published book, how long did it take?

A little over two years.

Describe your working environment.

Home office, with my feet up on the desk, and ample amounts of Coke Zero.

They say authors have immensely fragile egos… How would you handle negative criticism or a negative review?

I welcome any honest review that can offer constructive advice.  I don’t believe I corner the market on the topic.

Do you have another book on the works? Would you like to tell readers about your current or future projects? 

Yes.  A motivational book for middle-aged people.  I believe there is a niche.

ABOUT THE BOOK

Feeling stumped, stymied, or stupefied by a big (or small) decision? A new book, The Art of Making Good Decisions takes the guesswork out of common decision-making quandaries and explains how to make good, solid, choices—easily, quickly, and consistently.

Sources estimate that an individual makes more than 30,000 conscious decisions each day.  While most decisions are relatively minor—researchers at Cornell University suggest that persons typically make over 200 decisions a day on food alone—decisions, even the small ones, matter.  Consequently, being able to make consistently good, solid decisions is vitally important to our well-being, our livelihood, and our happiness.

Written by Atlanta area resident Philip Kimble, The Art of Making Good Decisions, explains how—and why—to make good decisions.  A groundbreaking book filled with fascinating insights, tips, tricks and techniques, The Art of Making Good Decisions sheds light on such topics as:  the three driving elements to any decision; elements of the decision model sequence; the key component behind bad decisions; how to recognize a good decision; what happens when decisions need to be tweaked—aka zigging and zagging;  becoming a more confident decision maker; and other important topics. Moreover, The Art of Making Good Decisions is filled with step-by-step examples, sage advice, and anecdotes.

So the next time you find yourself frustrated, flummoxed, or frazzled when facing a decision, take heart:  by applying the principles outlined in The Art of Making Good Decisions, you can begin your transition from inaction to decisiveness and bring sense and clarity to choices. Now that’s a good decision.

Find out more on Amazon

 

 

 

Be Sociable, Share!