Do you shop at Amazon.com? Are you aware they have a back door through which hackers can slip in?

11DLet’s look at Eric’s experience with hackers and Amazon, as he recounts at medium.com/@espringe.

He received an e-mail from Amazon and contacted them to see what it was about. Amazon informed him that he had had a text-chat and sent him the transcript—which he had never been part of.

Eric explains that the hacker gave Eric’s whois.com data to Amazon. However, the whois.com data was partially false because Eric wanted to remain private.

So Eric’s “fake” whois.com information wasn’t 100 percent in left field; some of it was true enough for the customer service hack to occur, because in exchange for the “fake” information, Amazon supplied Eric’s real address and phone number to the hacker.

The hacker got Eric’s bank to get him a new copy of his credit card. Amazon’s customer service had been duped.

Eric informed Amazon Retail to flag his account as being at “extremely high risk” of getting socially engineered. Amazon assured him that a “specialist” would be in contact (who never was).

Over the next few months, Eric assumed the problem disintegrated; he gave Amazon a new credit card and new address. Then he got another strange e-mail.

He told Amazon that someone was impersonating him, and Amazon told him to change his password. He insisted they keep his account secure. He was told the “specialist” would contact him (who never did). This time, Eric deleted his address from Amazon.

Eric became fed up because the hacker then contacted Amazon by phone and apparently got the last digits of his credit card. He decided to close his Amazon account, unable to trust the giant online retailer.

  • Frequently log into your account to check on orders. See if there are transactions you are unaware of. Look for “ship to” addresses you didn’t authorize.
  • Amazon’s customer support reps should be able to see the IP address of the user who’s connecting. They should be on alert for anything suspicious, such as whether or not the IP address is the one that the user normally connects with.
  • Users should create aliases with their e-mail services, to throw off hacking attempts. In other words, having the same email address for all your online accounts will make it easy for them to be compromised.
  • If you own domain names, check out the “whois” info associated with the account. It may be worth making it private.

Be very careful when sharing information about yourself. Do not assume that just because a company is a mega giant (like Amazon), it will keep your account protected from the bad guys.

Robert Siciliano is an identity theft expert to BestIDTheftCompanys.com discussing identity theft prevention.

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