It’s about time: a biometric for your smartphone that will change the way you think about biometric security.

This revolutionary biometric comes from Biometric Signature ID and it’s called BioTect-ID, and though it’s a biometric, it does not involve any so-called invasiveness of collecting body part information. The world’s first biometric password involves multi-factor authentication and just your finger—but not prints!

All you need to make this technology work to lock down your mobile device is a four-character password. But you can also draw a symbol like a star, leaf, a shining sun or smiley face as your password.

So suppose your password is PTy5 or a star. And suppose the wrong person learns this. In order for that person to get into your locked phone, they will have to literally move their finger exactly as you did to draw the “PTy5” or the star. This will be impossible.

BioTect-ID’s technology captures your finger’s movements, its gestures, and this biometric can’t be stolen or replicated.

BioTect-ID doesn’t stop there, however. The finger gesture biometric is only one component of the overall security. You’ve probably heard of “two-factor” authentication. This is when, in addition to typing in your password or answering a security question, you receive a text, phone call or e-mail showing a one-time numerical security code. You use that code to gain access. But this system can be circumvented by hackers.

And the traditional biometrics such as fingerprints and voice recognition can actually be stolen and copied. So if, say, your fingerprint is obtained and replicated by a cyber thief…how do you replace that? A different finger? What if eventually, the prints of all fingers are stolen? Then what? Or how do you replace your voice or face biometrics?

Biometrics are strong security because they work. But they have that downside. It’s pretty scary.

BioTect-ID solves this problem because you can replace your password with a new password, providing a new finger gesture to capture, courtesy of the patented software BioSig-ID™. Your finger movement, when drawing the password, involves:

  • Speed
  • Direction
  • Height
  • Length
  • Width
  • And more, including if you write your password backwards or outside the gridlines.

Encryption software stores these unique-to-you features.

Now, you might be wondering how the user can replicate their own drawing on subsequent password entries. The user does not need to struggle to replicate the exact appearance of the password, such as the loop on the capital L. Dynamic biometrics captures the user’s movement pattern.

So even though the loop in the L on the next password entry is a bit smaller or longer than the preceding one, the movement or gesture will match up with the one used during the enrollment. Thus, if a crook seemingly duplicates your L loop and other characters as far as appearance, his gestures will not match yours—and he won’t be able to unlock the phone.

In fact, the Tolly Group ran a test. Subjects were given the passwords. None of the 10,000 login attempts replicated the original user’s finger movements. Just because two passwords look drawn the same doesn’t mean they were created with identical finger gestures. Your unique gesture comes automatically without thinking—kind of like the way you walk or talk. The Tolly test’s accuracy was 99.97 percent.

Now doesn’t this all sound much more appealing than the possibility that some POS out there will steal your palm print—something you cannot replace?

Let’s get BioTect-ID’s technology out there so everyone knows about this groundbreaking advance in security. Here is what you’ll achieve:

  • You’ll be the first to benefit from this hack-proof technology
  • You’ll have peace of mind like you’ve never had before
  • Eliminated possible exposure of your body parts data kept in files

You can actually receive early edition copies of the app for reduced prices and get insider information if you become a backer on Kickstarter for a couple of bucks. Go to to do this.

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