As Wednesday approaches, there is more and more speculation on President Bush’s new Iraq strategy and what the Democrats can effectively do if they disagree with the Commander-in-Chief.

Senator Kennedy has been the most pro-active, saying he will introduce legislation today which will limit the President’s ability to get funding for more troops without Congressional approval. The Democrat from Massachusetts said that Iraq was in a state of civil war and that Senate would insist on accountability.

Not everyone in the Democratic party is favoring steps to stop the potentiality of a surge of troops. Notably, House majority leader Steny H. Hoyer has not backed the idea of financially blocking a troop surge.

Considering all this, the next few days will be a serious test of both President Bush’s leadership and the Democrats’ new majority in Congress.

Can Bush convince the opposition that an increase of troops can actually yield results? There already is a view that the whole Iraq campaign has been one gradual surge, with matters getting worse instead of better. When increased security is attempted, it oftentimes leads to an increase in violence. On November 23, during a week when the US sought to increase security in Baghdad, the city saw the biggest level of carnage in a day.

The Democrats have won Congressional dominance, but can they hold up as a party? The Bush Administration will be making compelling arguments for its strategy and some may feel they may be perceived as unpatriotic if they don’t go along.

The opportunities are there for both parties. The Bush Administration can show maturity and work together with the Democrats in finding a solution. The Democrats can offer a viable alternative that party members will stand by.

Dmitri Marine blogs on Blogue North

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