… about Why the Total Grams of Corn Sugar Are Not Listed on the “Nutrition Facts” Portion of Food Labels Such as on Coke, Pepsi and Big Gulps Along Side of Cane Sugar on “Nutrition Facts” Portion of Food Labels Along Side of Cane Sugar?

This is a guest article by Mannie Barling and Ashley F. Brooks

This article will not repeat information about the toxic ingredients used to refine Monsanto’s genetically modified Bt corn into high fructose corn syrup (corn sugar).  Nor will it contain information on the bacteria residues left in the process of refining corn into high fructose corn syrup or the problems associated with mercury residue after refining.  This information is already contained in other articles and will not be repeated here.

The Corn Refiners Association (CRA) has spent literally millions on a campaign to convince Americans that corn sugar and cane sugar are the same – natural sugars handled by the human body in a similar fashion.  Don’t be deceived by these ads, corn sugar is high fructose corn syrup by another name.

In spite of the industries’ claims that corn sugar and cane sugar are the same, the FDA has declared that HFCS is not ‘natural’, stating, “The use of synthetic fixing agents in the enzyme preparation, which is then used to produce HFCS, would not be consistent with our policy regarding the use of the term ‘natural’.”  High fructose corn syrup cannot be found anywhere in nature.

When the politically influenced FDA contradicts with the food industry, that contradiction speaks volumes about just how wrong the claims of the Corn Refiners Association and the high fructose corn syrup industry really are.

To protect their members financial interest, the CRA attacks anyone who disagrees with them by employing carefully executed clouds of deception and smoke screens of misinformation.  The industry and CRA’s objective is to confuse Americans into thinking their product is no different that consuming cane sugar.  You will see some of their smoke screens and deception in the form of posts on our blogs and that of others.

To further their goals, CRA has also created a front of websites to disseminate their misinformation.  They even offered bribes ($50 gift certificates to Walmart) to bloggers on MomCentral.com to write favorable blogs about corn sugar (high fructose corn syrup) is sugar – which is about as low as any organization can sink.
Despite clear and convincing evidence to the contrary, we are going to assume for a moment that corn sugar deserves equal status (which it doesn’t) with cane sugar and take the next step and examine how it is treated (or not treated) on food labels.  We ask the CRA and the food industry to answer these questions.

If Corn Sugar (High Fructose Corn Syrup) Is the Same as Cane Sugar, Why Doesn’t Corn Sugar (High Fructose Corn Syrup) Appear as a Line Item on the “Nutrition Facts” Section of the Label Next to Sugar?

The “Nutrition Facts” section on food labels requires the exact number of grams of sugar to be disclosed.  Many tests have proven that food manufacturers routinely keep their sugar levels as low as possible to avoid criticism from parents, the American Heart Association, the American Diabetes Association and other groups concerned about the health of Americans, especially vulnerable children.

Corn sugar is a product designed to provide the flavor of sugar without disclosing the amount of sugar on the label.  It is chemically-created sugar in wolf’s clothing.  High fructose corn syrup (corn sugar) is buried further down the label in a nondescript manner that avoids consumer attention.  Shockingly, the FDA and USDA know this fact and permit manufacturers to actively conceal the total amount of sugar in food products by using high fructose corn syrup.  It is the worst kept secret in the nation.

It is so cheap that it is literally used as a filler in some foods (breakfast cereals and frozen meals) while adding sweetness.  There are no other logical reasons to put a chemically-created sugar-filler into food.

What Products Contain Corn Sugar (High Fructose Corn Syrup)?

Well, high fructose corn syrup is in just about every packaged food that is not organic.  But it is not for sale as a stand alone product in markets or even food at wholesalers.  Do you know anyone who uses corn sugar (high fructose corn syrup) in a recipe?  Have you ever read a recipe that calls for corn sugar (high fructose corn syrup)?  Try asking your local market if they stock corn sugar.  They wont know what you are talking about.

More than 9,000 products on market shelves contain high fructose corn syrup (oops, corn sugar).  It is literally impossible to walk down your market aisles without finding it at every turn.  There is not enough room to discuss all of the products, so we will use only the most popular soft drinks as examples below.  We will provide information on the other market products in later articles.

How Much Corn Sugar (High Fructose Corn Syrup) Is There in a 12-ounce Can or Bottle or Pepsi or Coke?

According to a 2009 study published in The Journal of Clinical Investigation, “Foods and beverages in the US are typically sweetened with sucrose (50% glucose and 50% fructose) or high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS).”  According to the study, the FDA permits food manufacturers to use as much as 55% high fructose corn syrup.

Typically, there is one gram of corn sugar (high fructose corn syrup) for every gram of cane sugar.  In the case of Pepsi and Coke, there are 41 grams of sugar in a can, listed right on their “Nutrition Facts” labels, and another 41 grams of hidden corn sugar (high fructose corn syrup) contained in each can to increase the level of sweetness.  Wouldn’t it be easier and more honest to just say the can of Pepsi or Coke contains 82 grams (almost 3 ounces) of sugar?

If corn sugar is sugar, then why doesn’t the industry just put the number of grams of corn sugar on the “Nutrition Facts” label?  What are they afraid of?  Is it possible that disclosure of the total amount of grams of sugar on the label will affect sales?

If corn sugar (high fructose corn syrup) were listed on every label, how much total sugar do you think you and/or your children are consuming each day?  It is our opinion that the amount is four to five times higher than the recommended daily allowance (RDA) of sugar and 6 times higher than the RDA from the American Heart Association.  Some people consume even more.

What Are the Practical Effects of Not Including the Grams of Corn Sugar on Ingredients Labels?

The simple fact is that parents are unaware of the amount of sugar (or sugar equivalents) contained in canned soft drinks, soft drinks sold from soda dispensers in theaters and convenience stores.  For example, we went to the movies this week and bought a small Coke at the concession stand.  There was no “Nutrition Facts” label on the container.  No information of any kind for that matter.

The small size contains 28 ounces.  The medium size contains 36 ounces and the large size, 48 ounces.  There are six teaspoons of sugar per ounce.  There are 28 grams in an ounce.  The amounts of grams per can of soda were taken from the cans themselves and the sizes of 7-11’s Big Gulps come directly from their website.  You can do the math yourself using the formula supplied by The Journal of Clinical Investigation study and the “Nutrition Facts” on the cans.  If a full disclosure of the total amount of sugar (and sugar equivalents) were made as a line item on the “Nutrition Facts” section of the labels on Coke and Pepsi, they would read:

!    28 ounce serving would contain 95 grams of sugar and up to 95 grams of corn sugar (high fructose corn syrup) for a total of approximately 190 grams (6.8 ounces or 40.8 teaspoons) of total sugar.

!    36 ounce serving would contain 123 grams of sugar and up to 123 grams of corn sugar (high fructose corn syrup) for a total of approximately 246 grams (8.8 ounces or 52.8 teaspoons) of total sugar.

!    48 ounce serving would contain 164 grams of sugar and up to 164 grams of corn sugar (high fructose corn syrup) for a total of approximately 328 grams (11.7 ounces or 70.2 teaspoons) of total sugar.

The “Big Gulp” line of soft drinks, sold in 7-11 convenience stores, consist of the following size containers taken from their website.  The math computations are ours:

!    The Big Gulp contains 32 ounces of soft drink which contains 107 grams of sugar and up to 107 grams of corn sugar (high fructose corn syrup) for a total of approximately 214 grams (7.6 ounces or 45.6 teaspoons) of total sugar.

!    Super Big Gulp contains 44 ounces of soft drink which contains 133 grams of sugar and up to 133 grams of corn sugar (high fructose corn syrup) for a total of approximately 266 grams (9.5 ounces or 57 teaspoons) of total sugar.

!    The Double Gulp contains 64 ounces of soft drink which contains 213 grams of sugar and up to 213 grams of corn sugar (high fructose corn syrup) for a total of approximately 426 grams (15.2 ounces or 91.2 teaspoons) of total sugar.

!    Team Gulp contains 128 ounces of soft drink containing 427 grams of sugar and up to 427 grams of corn sugar (high fructose corn syrup) for a total of approximately 854 grams (30.5 grams or 183 teaspoons) of total sugar.

We all know people who drink at least a six-pack of Coke or Pepsi a day.  We have at least one friend who feasted on more than one Big Gulp a day.  Others we know consume even more.  In 2009 the per capita use of high fructose corn syrup reached 63.6 pounds (170,956.8 teaspoons) per person. That number is double that amount for sugary drink lovers because many other Americans do not drink soft drinks containing sugar.  For example, Bubbling Over: Soda Consumption and Its Link to Obesity disclosed that the average California teen consumes 39 pounds of liquid sugar a year from drinking sodas.

A six-pack of Coke or Pepsi (72 ounces) contains 246 grams of sugar and approximately 246 grams of corn sugar (high fructose corn syrup) for a total of approximately 492 grams (17.6 ounces or 105.6 teaspoons) of total sugar based upon the formula provided by the 2009 study published in The Journal of Clinical Investigation and the information on the cans.

The practical effect is that corn sugar (high fructose corn syrup), which is not included in the “Nutrition Facts” portion of the label and not even displayed on the sodas purchased at the movies or on Big Gulp containers, is contributing to weight gain, obesity, food addiction, diabetes, liver and kidney disease as well as cancer.  The research supporting these concerns is now legion.

Can you believe the Corn Refiners Association ads that “sugar is sugar” when so many Americans are overweight and there are waiting lines for kidney and liver transplants?  If high fructose corn syrup is not a problem, then why are they so afraid to tell you how much of it is in a product?  Decide for yourself.

And, every doctor and researcher in the U.S. agree that cancer is carried along its nefarious journey on the back of sugar.  How can the members of the Corn Refiners Association, their executives, their employees and public relations personnel sleep at night knowing that they are unleashing this horror on the children of America?

And, how can we as parents and concerned Americans continue to take a blind eye to an industry whose only interest is to addict children and increase profits from a chemically altered form of sugar that should be classified as an illegal drug.

The Corn Refiners Association is the industries’ mouthpiece, much like in the old gangster movies, that tries to protect the industry from the consequences of their actions.  How many millions of dollars annually does the food industry and the CRA contribute to lobbyists and politicians to achieve their goal of addicting the children of America on soft drinks?

How many millions more in advertisements and bribes will they spend in their death march of greed and insensitivity to the declining health of Americans before this stops?  More importantly, what are we going to do as a nation to stop this charade?

Mannie Barling and Ashley F. Brooks, R.N., are the authors of award winning books – Arthritis, Inflammation, Gout, Crohn’s, IBD and IBS – How to Eliminate Pain and Extend your Life (Books and Authors 2010 Best Books in the Health, Diet & Reference Categories) and Mannie’s Diet and Enzyme Formula – A Change of Lifestyle Diet Designed for Everyone (Blogger News Net 2010 Best Health And Nutrition Book Award winner) available at HowToEliminatePain.com, Amazon, Barnes&Noble, and other booksellers around the world.

The authors’ latest book, It’s Not Your Fault – Weight Gain, Obesity and Food Addiction is now available at HowtoEliminatePain.com, Amazon and booksellers everywhere.

Mannie Barling and Ashley F. Brooks are the co-hosts of Surviving the 21st Century with Simon Barrett on Blogger News Network on Saturdays at 10:00 A.M. PST/1:00 PM EST found at http://www.bloggernews.net or Blog Talk Radio.

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