With all the bruhaha about “petroleum addiction”, the dirty little secret is that until there is another cheap form of energy, no matter how many “trade sanctions” are imposed on Iran, that country will manage to find third parties to sell it’s oil.

The way this is done is that a third country buys the item, and then sells it to another buyer.

And, if worse comes to worse, there is always smuggling, and lots of people willing to make a buck.

So the Jerusalem Post  has an article that Israel might be indirectly buying oil from Iran, because the middle men often pool the oil and there is no way to tell if it originated in Iran or a more “friendly” country, such as Saudi Arabia or Russia.

But oil is not the only Iranian item that is widely being sold in Israel.

The problem? Pistachio nuts.

Yes, Pistachio nuts.

It seems that these tasty snacks don’t grow in many places, and in the Middle East, most of them come from Iran.

And Israel, which spends $20 million a year on the tasty nuts, which they eat as snack food, is the highest per capita consumer in the world.

Israel, which buys the pistachios from Turkey, insists that they were grown there, but other sources say that Turkish consumers eat most of their locally grown nuts, meaning that someone is pulling a fast one on Israel.

Since the US is the second largest source of Pistachio nuts, needless to say, the US is a bit annoyed. The IHTribune even mentions that Israel plans to check the pistachios chemically to find where they had been grown, in order to insure that they aren’t eating illicit Iranian nuts.

And the quote of the day is this tongue in cheek observation that Israelis need to change their snacking habits:

Every pistachio nut brings Iran another step closer to achieving nuclear capability, and though the US ambassador has placed responsibility for the fiasco primarily on the government’s shoulders, the pistachio crisis may require Israeli citizens to be more discerning in their eating habits.

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Nancy Reyes is a retired physician living in the rural Philippines. Her website is Finest Kind Clinic and Fishmarket.

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