Last December, Congress thought they’d help us all out by banning the good old incandescent light bulb. Being the highly trained scientists that they are, Congress thought that by making rules supporting and promoting the use of CFL bulbs, they’d promote the kitschy ideas of forestalling global warming. Of course, the scariest words in the history of man are “I’m from the government and I’m here to help you,” and this idiot move by Congress is no exception.

In this case, the our government dolts thought that saving volts was better than worrying if the mercury inside the new CFL bulbs presented a contamination problem for anyone unfortunate enough to break one. It turns out that if someone were to drop and break one of these “earth saving” bulbs it would spread mercury contamination all over the house and special care must be taken to clean up the mess. Yes, the light bulbs that are supposed to save the world are poisonous to our health! (the EPA has published a 7 page instruction manual on cleaning up a broken CFL)

Well, now we can give Congresswoman Michele Bachmann of Minnesota a pat on the back for attempting to repeal the stupidity of forcing Americans to switch over to these hazardous bulbs with a bill that will repeal the requirements to get rid of the old incandescent bulbs with the Light Bulb Freedom of Choice Act. (H.R. 5616)

I hope everyone calls their Congressman and urges them to support this bill. Good job, Rep. Bachmann.

MSNBC has given us the latest on the danger that these newfangled CFL light bulbs present.

Compact fluorescent light bulbs, long touted by environmentalists as a more efficient and longer-lasting alternative to the incandescent bulbs that have lighted homes for more than a century, are running into resistance from waste industry officials and some environmental scientists, who warn that the bulbs’ poisonous innards pose a bigger threat to health and the environment than previously thought.

Remember, the government is only here to help!

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