Book is tinged by the Horrors Author Encountered in Spain

Oppression and Liberty was published posthumously by Simone Weil in 1955. How has it stood the test of time? 52 years after it’s release, how has it fared?

Is it more popular today as it was when it came out?

The book, a comparative view of political systems, trends and features, looks at socialism and its political system rivals.

A little about the book.

OPPRESSION AND LIBERTY
Simone Weil, Arthur Wills (Translator), Preface by T. S. Elliot
Routledge, reprint (2001)
(published posthumously as Oppression et Liberté in 1955)

“The only hope of socialism resides in those who have already brought about in themselves, as far as is possible in the society of today, that union between manual and intellectual labor which characterizes the society we are aiming at.” Simone Weil, Oppression and Liberty (1958 edition), Chapter 1, from The Columbia World of Quotations (1996)

“It would seem that man was born a slave, and that slavery is his natural condition. At the same time nothing on earth can stop man from feeling himself born for liberty. Never, whatever may happen, can he accept servitude; for he is a thinking creature.” Simone Weil, Oppression and Liberty (1958 edition), Chapter 4, from The Columbia World of Quotations (1996)

(quoted on Bartleby.com)

In Oppression and Liberty (1955) she [Simone Weil] is concerned with the nature and possibility of individual freedom in various political and social systems, finally opting for liberalism rather than socialism. (from Pegasos website)

Oppression and Liberty’s author, Simone Weil (1909-1943), gained fame after her death for her writing. The book has had introductions by both T.S. Eliot and Albert Camus.

Read rest of story:

Oppression et Liberté : Socialist Disillusion from a Former True Believer

Source:

Oppression et Liberté : Socialist Disillusion from a Former True Believer

Mondoreb blogs at Death By 1000 Papercuts. Interested readers can e-mail him at
mondoreb@gmail.com.

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