If Oprah likes Obama, does that mean voters will like him, too? Maybe yes, maybe no, according to the results of a telephone survey of more than 1,000 people by the Pew Research Center for the People and the Press. Reports trade publication Broadcasting & Cable:

According to the survey, 15% said Oprah’s endorsement would make them more likely to vote for Obama, while the same 15% said it would make them less likely and 69% said it would make no difference. That is down from a 2000 poll that found that 14% said her endorsement would make them more likely to vote for a candidate and 11% less likely.

But 60% still said they thought Oprah’s support would help his overall candidacy, while only 3% said it would hurt, although how that squares with the vote results is not clear.

There was a clear split along party with an Oprah endorsement, however, with 23% of Democrats saying her endorsement of a candidate (not necessarily Obama) would make them more likely to vote for that candidate, while only 13% said it would make them less likely. It was reversed for Republicans, with 10% saying it would help and 22% hurt.

Other celebrities have even less pull with voters, according to the poll:

† Jay Leno: 6 percent more likely to vote for a candidate he endorsed; 16 percent, less likely; and 78 percent would just laugh off his political judgment.

† Bill O’Reilly: 11 percent more likely to support his presidential pick; 21 percent, less likely; and 68 percent, say he has no impact on their preference.

† Jon Stewart: 10 percent more likely to put their trust in his choice for president; 15 percent less likely; and 75 percent would fake him out by voting the way they planned to all along.

† Donald Trump: 5 percent are more likely to pick the candidate The Donald says just can’t be beat; 20 percent less likely; and 75 percent don’t think his opinion should be the boss of them.

† Tiger Woods: 6 percent more likely to swing toward Tiger’s choice; 13 percent less likely; 79 percent think political punditry from Woods is stepping in a voter’s line.Tiger Woods: 6 percent more likely to swing toward Tiger’s choice; 13 percent less likely; 79 percent think political punditry from Woods is stepping in a voter’s line.

The Stiletto wonders whether Anna Nicole Smith’s endorsement would help or hurt a candidate in Chicago, Detroit, St. Louis and other places where dead people tend to vote.

Note: The Stiletto writes about politics and other stuff at The Stiletto Blog.

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